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DIY is in decline because today's men are too soft
#1
Quote: A few days ago, the owners of Homebase announced they are to close a quarter of UK stores because of the reality, they said, of "a generation less skilled in DIY projects”.

Harsh obituary writers were quick to point out that Homebase is overpriced and a bit, well, crap compared to B&Q, but the sobering truth is that the entire DIY sector has taken a hammering in recent years.

Some might argue that the demise of DIY is down to the fact that home ownership on the decline, as more of us are forced to rent, unable to get on the property ladder. (Thought: if Homebase had stocked "property ladders" maybe their fortunes would have improved?)

Yet, undeniably, today’s 20- and 30-somethings don’t seem to possess your traditional “dad skills”. The dismal fact that a mere five per cent of 18-24s would attempt to unblock a sink doesn’t bode well for humanity – unless you’re a plumber.

Although the UK DIY sector is still worth a healthy £7.3 billion per year, that’s its lowest annual worth since 1999, and if it continues to decline at the current rate of 13 per cent per annum, there will be no DIY sector at all by 2040.

By then, Britain will have slowly drowned under the collective ocean of blocked bogs and leaky radiators.

Which is bad enough, before you begin to ask whether the decline in DIY is actually indicative of a deeper malaise in masculinity.

DIY used to make us feel manly. We’d chuck on a tool belt, press our power drill’s trigger – perhaps while even growling – and feel the testosterone course through our veins.

The trouble is, being a man – in the old-fashioned sense – is deeply unfashionable, naff almost, these days.

At some point this century, bombarded by an agonizingly right-on, feminist, PC doctrine through the liberal media, many men decided it was time to stop being men and embrace their inner sister.

Metropolitan, largely office-working men launched a mass PR campaign to win the hearts and minds of women – and their peers. They publicly decried wolf whistling and Page 3 of The Sun - while privately consuming a tidal wave of internet porn (ironically making them do-it-yourselfers in a very different sense).

Men were clamouring over themselves to be seen as anything but sexist.

But as we lost our rough edges and took on more of what had traditionally been regarded as female roles, no one really stopped to question whether equality for women came with a cost for masculinity. If everything overtly “masculine” is dismissed as sexist, what’s left of men is, arguably, sexless.

You see this behavioural androgyny everywhere, from the increasingly corporate and sterile football terraces to the Croc-wearing househusband on the school run.

In an age where we’re expected to Hoover, iron, change nappies, make a woman climax for four hours like Sting and cook like Jamie Oliver, old-fashioned pursuits like DIY have become quaint, self-indulgent and almost shameful.

The result is that many modern men are more like our mothers than our fathers, while the opposite is true for women, who are increasingly wearing the trousers.

Women decry us for not being able to wire a plug like our dads, but can – or would – they cook a cracking apple crumble like their mums?

No, they’d rather watch some bugger else do it on the Great British Bake Off, then go to M&S – just like we’d rather watch Grand Designs, then pay a Polish geezer to do our wallpapering.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/thinking-...-soft.html

UKie article, but applies here as well. How many Spin Room liberals do you think can diagnose and fix a basic car problem? Heck, change a tire?
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#2
These skills are not taught anymore. They are discouraged in many instances. Economic and educational policies and actions have wreaked havoc.

I've said for many years that the popularity of Bob Villa and Martha Stewart were b/c they took shop class and home ec out of the schools for most kids.

Now that the family structure has disintegrated further, and millennials don't own homes or cars, these skills are disappearing even more. This generation is suited for becoming slaves. And they relish it.
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#3
I'll be honest, I'm dumb when it comes to cars.. I can change a battery, jump it if needed, change a tire, etc.. But anything mechanical, I'm an idiot.

Same with a house.. I can build a deck, fence, shed, etc.. You want me to work on the HVAC or plumbing, I'm not so sharp in those areas.. I mean I can change the filters, sinks, etc.. But when we get into the mechanics of an AC unit or digging up piping and stuff like that.. I'll pay a guy who likes to wrangle turds if it's beyond me.
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#4
(10-27-2014, 09:09 AM)DrTorch Wrote: These skills are not taught anymore.  They are discouraged in many instances.  Economic and educational policies and actions have wreaked havoc.

I've said for many years that the popularity of Bob Villa and Martha Stewart were b/c they took shop class and home ec out of the schools for most kids.

Now that the family structure has disintegrated further, and millennials don't own homes or cars, these skills are disappearing even more.  This generation is suited for becoming slaves.  And they relish it.

This is true.... I feel like I am playing catch up with home maintenance skills because my "shop class" was 45 minutes of wates time making a drill gauge. It would have been great if they had us put together a sink or something like that.
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#5
(10-27-2014, 09:22 AM)gdunn Wrote: I'll be honest, I'm dumb when it comes to cars.. I can change a battery, jump it if needed, change a tire, etc.. But anything mechanical, I'm an idiot.

Same with a house.. I can build a deck, fence, shed, etc.. You want me to work on the HVAC or plumbing, I'm not so sharp in those areas.. I mean I can change the filters, sinks, etc.. But when we get into the mechanics of an AC unit or digging up piping and stuff like that.. I'll pay a guy who likes to wrangle turds if it's beyond me.

I'm the opposite. I can fix pretty much anything but can't build worth a shit. I just don't have the patience for precision.
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#6
(10-27-2014, 10:02 AM)EverRespect Wrote:
(10-27-2014, 09:22 AM)gdunn Wrote: I'll be honest, I'm dumb when it comes to cars.. I can change a battery, jump it if needed, change a tire, etc.. But anything mechanical, I'm an idiot.

Same with a house.. I can build a deck, fence, shed, etc.. You want me to work on the HVAC or plumbing, I'm not so sharp in those areas.. I mean I can change the filters, sinks, etc.. But when we get into the mechanics of an AC unit or digging up piping and stuff like that.. I'll pay a guy who likes to wrangle turds if it's beyond me.

I'm the opposite.  I can fix pretty much anything but can't build worth a shit.  I just don't have the patience for precision.

It's easy.. My dad used to get mad at me because I'm anal when building things.. He's been known to throw hammers at me..
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#7
(10-27-2014, 10:04 AM)gdunn Wrote:
(10-27-2014, 10:02 AM)EverRespect Wrote:
(10-27-2014, 09:22 AM)gdunn Wrote: I'll be honest, I'm dumb when it comes to cars.. I can change a battery, jump it if needed, change a tire, etc.. But anything mechanical, I'm an idiot.

Same with a house.. I can build a deck, fence, shed, etc.. You want me to work on the HVAC or plumbing, I'm not so sharp in those areas.. I mean I can change the filters, sinks, etc.. But when we get into the mechanics of an AC unit or digging up piping and stuff like that.. I'll pay a guy who likes to wrangle turds if it's beyond me.

I'm the opposite.  I can fix pretty much anything but can't build worth a shit.  I just don't have the patience for precision.

It's easy.. My dad used to get mad at me because I'm anal when building things.. He's been known to throw hammers at me..

If I tried to put up a fence, it would look like a 3rd grade art project. Funny you said that because we are looking at putting in a fence this spring and are about to start getting quotes. Meanwhile, I fixed the heater last spring. Turned out the blades of the draft inducer fan rusted and fell off so the gas would not stay lit (safety feature). Bought a used replacement on ebay for $20 and put it in with a little slicing. The part is $199 new on the open market. Can't imagine what a technician would have charged to diagnose and install it after their markup... and that is assuming they wouldn't have told me the whole unit is shot and needs to be replaced. The little victories.
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#8
My parents enjoy when I would build sheds and fence around the property.. Until they got ready to tear it down.. I like to quikcrete in my posts so I know they're not going anywhere...
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#9
(10-27-2014, 09:22 AM)gdunn Wrote: I'll be honest, I'm dumb when it comes to cars.. I can change a battery, jump it if needed, change a tire, etc.. But anything mechanical, I'm an idiot.

Same with a house.. I can build a deck, fence, shed, etc.. You want me to work on the HVAC or plumbing, I'm not so sharp in those areas.. I mean I can change the filters, sinks, etc.. But when we get into the mechanics of an AC unit or digging up piping and stuff like that.. I'll pay a guy who likes to wrangle turds if it's beyond me.

part of the problem is that they are building things where you cannot work on them anymore. Because I didn't have the correct wrench, I had to take the damn hood off just to get at one of my spark plugs.

That being said. Two things men should be able to do themselves and have zero respect for guys that hire illegal labor to do them.

1. Know how to change your own oil.
2. Mow your own fuckin lawn.
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#10
I try to personally repair everything that needs it.
With that said, there are a few times in which I made things worse.

Recently I saved over $1,500 installing my own safety pool cover.
Fortunately I have a neighbor that has the same mentality and owns a hammer drill.
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